Caring for dental implants

  • Not really. Most patients become accustomed to it after a few hours. However, be careful not to touch it frequently with your tongue or fingers. And clean it lightly with your toothbrush.

  • Basically: care for implant-supported crowns or bridges in exactly the same way as your natural teeth. This means thorough brushing twice a day and cleaning the spaces between your teeth once a day. An extremely important point for implants is the keep the emergence positions of the implants from the gum clean. It is best to clean these areas in the evening with a fine interdental brush.

  • If you wear a denture on your implants, you should clean not only the denture but also the attachment components emerging from the gum twice a day with the toothbrush. And this is important: clean all around the connection to the jaw with a fine interdental brush.

  • Bacteria in food residue and plaque can penetrate the gum and bone particularly easily at these points. This causes inflammation, which in the worst case may cause implant loss.

  • You can certainly do that. However, if you pull the dental floss quickly back and forth there is a danger that you might injure the gum. Interdental brushes are gentler, safer and more efficient. The hygiene team at your dentist, which is responsible for regular professional cleaning of your teeth, can show you how to use the small brushes correctly.

  • When you have your teeth professionally cleaned, specially trained dental assistants remove hidden and hard dental plaque that you cannot remove with your toothbrush or interdental brush. They also thoroughly polish the surfaces of your teeth to make it more difficult for plaque deposits to form.

  • Two or three appointments will normally provide optimum protection for your implants. However, your individual situation is the deciding factor. For example, if you have difficulty using the interdental brush correctly or are more prone to plaque formation, your dentist may recommend more frequent cleaning.

  • After healing is complete it is best to use a medium soft toothbrush with rounded and bundled bristles. Hard or low quality toothbrushes, particularly when pressed hard on the teeth, may cause the gum around the implants – and also around the natural cervix of the tooth – to retract. It is best to ask your dentist to recommend the right toothbrush and the right brushing technique.

  • Electric toothbrushes are no better or worse than a normal toothbrush. If you are used to an electric toothbrush and can use it correctly, there is no reason why you should not use it for your implant-supported teeth.

  • There are different opinions about this. On one hand a dental water jet has a good cleaning effect; on the other hand if the water jet is too powerful it may injure the gum and actually push bacteria under the gum. If you have not previously used a dental water jet, you should not really start using one with implants.

  • If you frequently use toothpaste with large abrasive particles it may roughen the surface of your new crowns, which will make it easier for plaque to form. In addition, abraded surfaces will discolor faster. You should select a standard toothpaste without a whitening effect for daily use.

  • Mouthwash is good for rinsing your mouth after snacks or for refreshing your mouth during the day. Some products may also help with inflammation. But be careful about self-medication: if you have gum problems for several days in succession or if your gum bleeds when you brush your teeth, you should make an appointment with your dentist.